Black Mirror Review

Marie Hayes, Opinions Editor

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Black Mirror, the title of the introspective dystopian Netflix show now in its fourth season, is perfectly named. The title taken literally describes the dark screens we look at when a computer or phone is turned off.

However, the title holds a double meaning. Each episode holds a mirror up to society and reflects our darkest tendencies.

Each episode is self-contained, which makes it great if you only have an hour to spare. Despite having no continuous plot, characters, or message, the episodes are tied together by Black Mirror’s amazing ability to use technology and how we interact with it as a metaphor for human nature.

“Archangel,” one of the episodes in the new season, is a perfect example of Black Mirror’s ability to highlight dark human impulses.  A mother becomes concerned with the protection of her daughter and takes the young girl to an experimental clinic that provides a type of big brother service.

A chip is implanted into the daughter’s neck, which allows the mother to navigate, see and hear everything the daughter experiences . The technology also allows the mother to blur out anything, like blood or violence, so that the daughter will not be exposed to them.

At first the technology provides peace for the once worrisome mother, but soon becomes a problem when the daughter becomes older.

The mother’s actions, although intrusive, perfectly portray the maternal tendency to protect children. Although the surveillance is wrong, the watcher feels sympathy for her and realizes the necessity of the action.  Black Mirror allows you to relate to the character and the deep love that the mother has for her daughter. On the other hand, the viewer also understands the daughter’s own wants to break away from her oppressive mother.

The show constantly challenges the audience to say, “What would I do in this situation?” The introspective aspect of the television show keeps you hooked and makes you question your own belief system.

Black Mirror does this by throwing humans into seemingly advanced situations. The setting almost always is a world that is highly organized and the character intelligent. However, the seemingly perfect system acts as a magnifying glass, amplifying every human flaw and making every decision essential.

Due to its addictive qualities and grade A amazing acting, I totally recommend giving Black Mirror a try. A small warning though, this show will make you question everything!

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