The Voice

Sex Work as Legitimate Work

Catherine Bowman, Managing Editor

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Sex work has long been a controversial topic; it seems like almost everyone has an opinion on what people should or shouldn’t be doing with their bodies. Sex work, defined as “the provision of sexual services for money or goods,” according to the World Health Organization, has been around for as long as people have been on the planet, even appearing in the Bible.

If Jesus can treat sex workers with dignity and respect, we should be able to do the same.  Nuns carry on the tradition today of treating everybody with respect and extending compassion to those marginalized in society. Who are we to judge a person’s decision to use their body to make money?

We shouldn’t–Sex work is legitimate work and should be respected.

For decades women have been fighting for the right to control their own bodies. Being against sex work acknowledges that the government should be able to tell women how to use their bodies.

While some people argue that women should not use their bodies as commodities, much of the advertising industry does just that. By recognizing sex work as legitimate work, we can give women control over their own bodies and control over how they use them.  Not to mention using their bodies to make money and support themselves.

Additionally, we can make it safer for everyone involved, especially protecting the sex workers from harm, by instituting reforms such as requiring that birth control be used, ensuring testing for STDs, and providing protection from violence. By recognizing sex work as legitimate work, sex workers will hopefully be given the same benefits as other “legitimate” jobs and will therefore be treated fairly.

If we legalize prostitution, sex work will no longer be dangerous or taboo. Once it is accepted, there would be a lower risk of sex workers being raped or assaulted because they are no longer hiding from law enforcement. They would be integrated into society, making it harder for criminals to prey on them.

So my question is, why not let sex workers and the sex work industry profit off the sex-obsessed masses? It only makes sense.

Clearly, the Catholic Church is against sex work, but primarily because the Church considers sex to be about unity and procreation. The Church does not have an official position on voluntary sex work, but it’s easy to deduce that the church’s position on the dignity of the human body would preclude sex work as a legitimate career choice.

As with any profession, and especially with a profession so thrust back into the corners of society, there are going to be risks and corrupt pockets. There is a large sex-trafficking issue that bleeds into the sex work industry, where boys and girls, men and women, are forced to participate in sex work after being preyed upon by evil people.

But we must combat this problem by bringing attention to it. If we continue to allow the topic of sex work, or even the word “sex” to continue to be so taboo, victims of sex-trafficking will continue to be in the shadows, unable to be helped because no one will talk about their struggle.

Voluntary sex workers, no matter how they came to the industry, are working of their own free will. They’re not sex slaves. They chose this as their profession and they will most likely continue doing it whether or not society accepts them.

If voluntary sex work is normalized and accepted, we can brighten the dark corners of the sex work industry and root out the sex-trafficking rings and help the people forced into sexual labor. We must stop writing voluntary sex workers off to be gross, or beneath us, or too taboo to even think about.

Sex work is legitimate work. It’s time we learn to respect sex workers and stop trampling on them because they chose a career that society deemed as below the standard.

If voluntary sex work is normalized and accepted, we can brighten the dark corners of the sex work industry and root out the sex-trafficking rings and help the people forced into sexual labor. We must stop writing voluntary sex workers off to be gross, or beneath us, or too taboo to even think about.

Sex work is legitimate work. It’s time we learn to respect sex workers and stop trampling on them because they chose a career that society deemed as below the standard.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Leave a Comment

We do not post comments that feature profanity or bad taste. We reserve the right to edit comments for length.

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




*

Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Sex Work as Legitimate Work

    Top Stories

    Historic Numbers of Women Running for Office

  • Sex Work as Legitimate Work

    Opinions

    Yay Pants!

  • Sex Work as Legitimate Work

    Features

    Coming Out Stories

  • Sex Work as Legitimate Work

    Sports

    If Pres Things Were in the Olympics

  • Sex Work as Legitimate Work

    Top Stories

    Holding Logan Paul Accountable

  • Sex Work as Legitimate Work

    Features

    A Model for Change – New Principal

  • Sex Work as Legitimate Work

    Arts & Entertainment

    Black Feminists and Womanists to Look Out For in 2018

  • Sex Work as Legitimate Work

    Top Stories

    Women’s Advocacy Club Presents a Pad Party

  • Sex Work as Legitimate Work

    Top Stories

    Pres in the Spotlight

  • Top Stories

    San Jose Makes Taylor Swift Blush As She Returns To The Stage

The School Newspaper of Presentation High School.
Sex Work as Legitimate Work