The School Newspaper of Presentation High School.

The Voice

Rated R for Ridiculous

Madison Affourtit, Copy Editor

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






It’s a Monday morning as you slug into class with your hood up and your sweats on. You barely got any sleep and you’re just about to accept another L when the teacher announces that you’re watching a movie. A ray of light shines down on the bags under your eyes and you suddenly regain hope.

But all is lost when she comes around to collect the permission slip that you forgot to get signed over the weekend, and you’re banished to the library with a packet of alternative work. There you sit, an 18-year-old, two months away from graduation, unable to witness “moderate violence” with your peers.

It’s no secret that kids have been watching R rated movies for a while. Although the label says 17+, it’s usually a milestone you reach when you’re around 12 or 13. Plus, let’s keep in mind that the MPAA, which created the rating system, did so as a recommendation, not a national law. Yet Presentation has a policy that states that any teacher that shows an R rated movie in class must require a signed parent permission slip, no matter your age.

The first issue with this is the fact that the policy is simply inconsistent and poorly carried out. It seems that some teachers are adamant about this and others couldn’t care less. Maybe because it’s a waste of paper, or maybe because they don’t believe it’s justified.

At such a prestigious and rigorous school, we are constantly expected to act like adults, yet we are consistently treated like children. For example, we were recently introduced to Apple Classroom, the Big Brother that makes sure we’re staying focused in class. This glaring example of intense regulation reminds us that with our limited freedoms comes mistrustful infantilization.

Most upper division classes consist of 17- and 18-year olds. The requirement for attending an R rated movie in theatres is 17 years old. Not to mention the fact that 18- year-olds are legal adults who, by law, don’t need their parents’ permission for anything.

Plus, laws aside, shouldn’t we be trusting our teachers to be showing us appropriate and relative content? The last movie I was required to get a permission slip for was Blood Diamond. This insightful telling of the Sierra Leone civil war recounted real events that are occurring in places all over the world today.

I find it odd that the school thinks it necessary to shelter us from the truths of our world, while claiming to educate us about current affairs. We aren’t being subjected to raunchy frathouse comedies, but rather, films that document important social justice issues.

Some argue that certain students are triggered by violence, rape, etc. However, the most severe of these cases are noted in a document that every teacher has access to, so they know which students might struggle with a certain movie and can give them a warning ahead of time, plus the option to skip the movie.

I’m convinced that our students are old enough to know what they can and can’t watch, and their parents’ insight on that matter is simply useless. Rather than having students be taken out of their class and separated from the curriculum, we should trust the judgment of both the teachers and the students as to what they can handle.

Print Friendly

Leave a Comment

We do not post comments that feature profanity or bad taste. We reserve the right to edit comments for length.

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




*

Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Rated R for Ridiculous

    Features

    Presentation’s New iPad Program

  • Rated R for Ridiculous

    Features

    Theatre, Trips and Clubs, Oh My!

  • Rated R for Ridiculous

    Top Stories

    Summer at Pres

  • Rated R for Ridiculous

    All Posts

    End of an Era: Presentation Center Closing

  • Rated R for Ridiculous

    Opinions

    Advanced Placement or Added Pressure?

  • Rated R for Ridiculous

    Features

    Traveling for Change

  • Rated R for Ridiculous

    Sports

    Student-Athlete Attendance Anxiety

  • Rated R for Ridiculous

    Features

    What Drives Mission Drive?

  • Rated R for Ridiculous

    Opinions

    Boy Scouts Pivot on Transgender Issues

  • Rated R for Ridiculous

    National/Local

    Pres Students Witness History

The School Newspaper of Presentation High School.
Rated R for Ridiculous