The Voice

Conceal This, Makeup Industry

The Dark Marketing Strategies of the Cosmetics Industry

Although+these+adorable+packaging+containers+seem+innocuous%2C+the+cosmetics+industry+uses+them+as+well+as+other+beauty+advertisements+to+fuel+a+makeup-purchasing+feedback+loop+based+on+consumer+insecurities.
Back to Article
Back to Article

Conceal This, Makeup Industry

Although these adorable packaging containers seem innocuous, the cosmetics industry uses them as well as other beauty advertisements to fuel a makeup-purchasing feedback loop based on consumer insecurities.

Although these adorable packaging containers seem innocuous, the cosmetics industry uses them as well as other beauty advertisements to fuel a makeup-purchasing feedback loop based on consumer insecurities.

Angie Leung

Although these adorable packaging containers seem innocuous, the cosmetics industry uses them as well as other beauty advertisements to fuel a makeup-purchasing feedback loop based on consumer insecurities.

Angie Leung

Angie Leung

Although these adorable packaging containers seem innocuous, the cosmetics industry uses them as well as other beauty advertisements to fuel a makeup-purchasing feedback loop based on consumer insecurities.

Angie Leung, Reporter

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Face it: in the attempt to efface all those blemishes and acne spots, you’ve become the Scylla of your most potent anxieties–gobbling jar after jar of genetically-damaging, genital-mutilating chemicals in irresistibly cute packaging. (Don’t worry–although these chemicals are linked to health side-effects, their long-term results still require further research). These pink containers, whimsical designs and “Hello Beautiful” fonts are at the heart of darkness of the most common cosmetics marketing strategies that spotlight you–specifically your longing for flawless skin, a more defined jawline, and fuller lips.  

Although these adorable packaging containers seem innocuous, the cosmetics industry uses them as well as other beauty advertisements to fuel a makeup-purchasing feedback loop based on consumer insecurities.

According to the African Journal of Business Management, the primary motive for purchasing cosmetic products is emotional alleviation, rather than the utility received from the design of the product or its consumption. Beauty and social media advertisements, featuring females who have “natural beauty” yet are unnaturally slender, cause consumers to socially compare themselves to those models, which in turn prompts individuals to develop their own insecurities and plummet self-esteem.

Buying cosmetic products, then, mitigates the wearers’ guilt over self-negligence of their looks. This is where cutesy packaging designs and beach-body models in beauty commercials kick in: many makeup companies over-promise their products’ abilities to conceal certain blemishes or to induce a miraculous lifestyle change in order to appeal to a consumers’ pathos and entice them to merchandise. As a result, disillusionment causes buyer to be ensnared in a cycle of consumer anxiety-driven makeup consumption. Talk about smart advertising.

Dr. Cui Su, Course Leader for MA Advertising at the London College of Communications, also agrees.

“For a woman with spots, ads for creams and lotions try to show her a better, likeable self, that a blemish-free version of her is possible. However, in order to ensure further purchases, this future is always deferred and never fully realised. So to sustain beauty industry going, anxiety is still an important part of the feel-good advertising mix.” says Su.  

On the other hand, junior Clara Veres emphasizes that transcending these beauty commercials and the negative feelings of discontent associated with them are most significant to overcoming this cycle of consumer anxiety and strengthening self-confidence. Additionally, she clarifies that not all cosmetic users are driven to wear makeup because they think their bare face is not beautiful; she points out that makeup is also a form of artistic expression.

But for the many consumers with insecurities about their body image, she observes the influence of this advertising.

Veres says, “[They] are constantly being bombarded with this beauty marketing in their everyday lives. The only way to overcome these consumers’ belief that they need makeup in order to be beautiful is for them to understand that the marketing and beauty standards being pushed by all these sources do not hold truth…Insecure consumers need to accept the truth that beauty is a subjective thing, and it is not defined by what the media and marketers push out to society.”

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Angie Leung, Reporter

Angie is a junior staff reporter for The Voice, and she is fascinated by language and culture as she is currently learning multiple languages, including...

Leave a Comment

We do not post comments that feature profanity or bad taste. We reserve the right to edit comments for length.

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




*

Navigate Left
  • Conceal This, Makeup Industry

    Top Stories

  • Conceal This, Makeup Industry

    Top Stories

    Unpaid Internships: Exposure for the Privileged

  • Conceal This, Makeup Industry

    Top Stories

    “Subtle Asian Traits:” A New Form of Ethnic Unity

  • Conceal This, Makeup Industry

    Top Stories

    Why I Hate Aziz Ansari

  • Conceal This, Makeup Industry

    Top Stories

    Triggered by Teaching

  • Conceal This, Makeup Industry

    Top Stories

    For Asian Americans, a Debate Over Racial Identity: Perspectives on Affirmative Action

  • Conceal This, Makeup Industry

    Top Stories

    Representing Reality

  • Conceal This, Makeup Industry

    Top Stories

    ‘Searching’ for a Daughter, but Also an Identity

  • Conceal This, Makeup Industry

    Top Stories

    After 41 Years at Pres, Mary Miller Announces Resignation as President

  • Conceal This, Makeup Industry

    Arts & Entertainment

    ‘Crazy Rich Asians’ Subverts Racial Tropes for Generations to Come

Navigate Right
The School Newspaper of Presentation High School.
Conceal This, Makeup Industry